UPDATE: Records unsealed in mayoral candidate shooting attempt

Quintez Brown is accused of firing a gun at Louisville mayoral candidate Craig Greenberg

Update from April 29, 2022:

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — A man accused of shooting at a Louisville mayoral candidate browsed the internet for location information of another candidate on the day of the shooting attempt, according to newly released internet search records.

Magistrate Judge Colin Lindsay unsealed the evidence Thursday. The records show that at 1 a.m. on Feb. 14, Quintez Brown, 22, searched Google for the location of the office of Republican Bill Dieruf. Dieruf is the mayor of Jeffersontown, a Louisville suburb.

The search records also show Brown looking at several of Dieruf’s social media posts.

Federal prosecutors have alleged that Brown wanted to kill candidate Democratic Craig Greenberg to prevent him from winning the upcoming mayoral election, citing Brown’s internet search history, text messages and online posts around the time of the February shooting.

Brown faces federal charges of “interfering with a federally protected right, and using and discharging a firearm in relation to a crime of violence by shooting at and attempting to kill a candidate for elective office.”

Greenberg said he was at his campaign headquarters on Feb. 14 with four colleagues when a man appeared in the doorway and began firing multiple rounds. He was not hit by the gunfire but said a bullet grazed his sweater. One staffer managed to shut the door, which they barricaded with tables and desks, and the shooter fled.

If convicted of all federal charges, Brown faces a mandatory minimum of 10 years in prison and maximum of life in prison in addition to any sentence he receives on state charges of attempted murder and wanton endangerment.

At a detainment hearing on April 15, federal prosecutors Federal prosecutors alleged that Brown searched for a candidate besides Greenberg but didn’t provide an identifying information.

Before the shooting, Brown was known to the community as a social justice activist who was running as an independent for Louisville’s metro council. He will remain in federal custody while U.S. District Judge Benjamin Beaton considers whether or not to grant his release to pre-trial home incarceration. A ruling is expected by May 5.

In a statement obtained by the Courier-Journal, Dieruf acknowledged that he was aware of the search records but was advised to not speak publicly because they were part of an ongoing investigation.

“I have been aware that Quintez Brown had searched my name on his computer since the FBI reviewed his Internet search history following the February incident,” he said.

“As mayor for the past 11 years, I’m sure my name has been Googled many times for various reasons,” Dieruf added. “It doesn’t change my daily life or the way I run the city.”

 

Update from April 28, 2022:

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — A man accused of shooting at a Louisville mayoral candidate will remain in custody while a federal judge considers his case after a detention hearing Thursday.

Western District of Kentucky Judge Benjamin Beaton said he will issue a written ruling sometime next week. A federal magistrate judge had granted Quintez Brown’s release to home incarceration, but prosecutors appealed.

At a detainment hearing on April 15, prosecutors alleged that Brown wanted to kill candidate Craig Greenberg to prevent him from winning the upcoming mayoral election, citing Brown’s internet search history, text messages and online posts around the time of the February shooting.

They also accused Brown of visiting the politician’s home the day before the attack but leaving after the gun he brought with him jammed. Assistant U.S. Attorney Amanda Gregory insisted that if released, Brown posed a risk of fleeing and could be a danger to the community.

Brown’s attorneys pointed to the fact that Brown had been on home incarceration for weeks without any issues before his federal arrest. They also asked the judge to consider the impact of Brown’s mental health treatment since the incident.

Brown faces federal charges of “interfering with a federally protected right, and using and discharging a firearm in relation to a crime of violence by shooting at and attempting to kill a candidate for elective office.”

Greenberg, a Democrat, said he was at his campaign headquarters Feb. 14 with four colleagues when a man appeared in the doorway and began firing multiple rounds. He was not hit by the gunfire but said a bullet grazed his sweater. One staffer managed to shut the door, which they barricaded with tables and desks, and the shooter fled.

If convicted of all federal charges, Brown faces a mandatory minimum of 10 years in prison and maximum of life in prison in addition to any sentence he receives on state charges of attempted murder and wanton endangerment.

He has pleaded not guilty in state and federal court.

Patrick Renn, one of Brown’s lawyers, said Thursday that the judge “seemed very thoughtful, very deliberate with the way that he was going about deciding” whether or not Brown would return to home incarceration.

“The fact that he is going to take time is actually, I think, in our favor because when you look at all the evidence in this case, under the statute that he’s required to follow, that he, too, is going to make a ruling that Mr. Brown should be released,” he added.

Brown was placed on home incarceration just days after the shooting. He was fitted with a GPS ankle monitor after a group called the Louisville Community Bail Fund paid the $100,000 cash bond.

His release to home incarceration drew bipartisan criticism, including from Greenberg, who said it was “nearly impossible to believe that someone can attempt murder on Monday and walk out of jail on Wednesday.”

Before the incident, 22-year-old Brown was known to the community as a social justice activist who was running as an independent for Louisville’s metro council.

 

Update from April 15, 2022:

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) – Federal prosecutors say the man accused of shooting at a Louisville mayoral candidate had visited the politician’s home the day before the attack, but left after the gun he brought with him jammed.

Prosecutors allege that 22-year-old Quintez Brown then went to Craig Greenberg’s campaign headquarters and shot at him.

Officials say Brown wanted to kill Greenberg to prevent him from winning the upcoming mayoral election.

Magistrate Judge Colin Lindsay on Friday granted Brown’s release to home incarceration, but the suspect remains in federal custody because the judge also granted a request from federal prosecutors to pause the release while they file an appeal.

 

Update from April 7, 2022:

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — A man charged with shooting at a Louisville mayoral candidate has been taken into federal custody, jail records show.

Quintez Brown, 22, is listed as a federal prisoner at the Grayson County Detention Center in Leitchfield, Kentucky.  Brown’s attorney, Rob Eggert, told the Louisville Courier Journal on Thursday that a federal grand jury had indicted his client. He said Brown was arrested Wednesday “by multiple federal agents,” the newspaper reported.

Eggert did not offer specifics about what Brown was charged with, and federal authorities did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

Brown was arrested by Louisville police shortly after the Feb. 14 shooting. The mayoral candidate, Craig Greenberg, said he was not hit by the gunfire, although a bullet grazed his sweater.

Greenberg, a Democrat, said he was at his campaign headquarters with four colleagues when a man appeared in the doorway and began firing multiple rounds. One staffer managed to shut the door, which they barricaded using tables and desks, and the shooter fled.

A police report said Brown was carrying a loaded 9 mm magazine in his pants pocket and had a drawstring bag with a handgun and additional magazines when he was arrested.

Brown was placed on home incarceration and fitted with a GPS ankle monitor after a group called the Louisville Community Bail Fund paid the $100,000 cash bond on Feb 16. A judge also ordered Brown to have no contact with Greenberg or his campaign staff and barred him from possessing firearms.

Brown’s house arrest prompted outrage from Greenberg, who said it was “impossible to believe” Brown could be released.

Last week, a Kentucky grand jury in Louisville indicted Brown on one count of attempted murder and four counts of first-degree wanton endangerment, all state charges. He has pleaded not guilty to the charges.

Brown, a social justice activist who was running as an independent for Louisville’s metro council, disappeared for about two weeks last summer. After he was found safe, his parents issued a statement asking for patience and privacy while they attended to his “physical, mental and spiritual needs.”

In March, a judge cleared Brown to receive a mental health evaluation to determine if he should be admitted to a psychiatric hospital for treatment.

Louisville police said in February that Brown appears to have acted alone. The motive also remains under investigation and has not been discussed publicly by authorities.

 

Update from March 28, 2022:

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — A Kentucky man who police said fired a handgun at a Louisville mayoral candidate has been indicted on attempted murder and endangerment charges.

Quintez Brown, 21, was arrested shortly after the Feb. 14 shooting. The mayoral candidate, Craig Greenberg, was not hit by the gunfire at his campaign office but said a bullet grazed his sweater.

A grand jury in Louisville on Monday indicted Brown on one count of attempted murder and four counts of first-degree wanton endangerment. Four of Greenberg’s staffers were nearby when the shooting occurred, according to a media release from Jefferson County Commonwealth’s Attorney Tom Wine.

Brown has been on home incarceration with an ankle monitor since he was released on bond shortly after his arrest. A group called the Louisville Community Bail Fund paid the $100,000 cash bond, prompting outrage from Greenberg, who said it was “impossible to believe” Brown could be released from jail after the shooting.

Brown’s lawyer said at a hearing last month that Brown has “serious mental issues.”

Greenberg, a Democrat, said he was at his campaign headquarters when a man appeared in the doorway and began firing multiple rounds. A staffer managed to shut the door, which they barricaded using tables and desks, and the suspect fled. Brown was apprehended about a half-mile from the office and arrested.

Brown was running for Louisville Metro Council at the time of the shooting. He will be arraigned on the charges April 4.

 

Update from February 28, 2022:

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — The man charged with shooting at a Louisville mayoral candidate will receive a mental health evaluation at a psychiatric hospital to determine if he should be admitted for treatment, according to a court order.

Metro council candidate Quintez Brown, 21, was arrested and charged with attempted murder and four counts of wanton endangerment shortly after the Feb. 14 shooting. Democratic mayoral candidate Craig Greenberg was not hit but said a bullet grazed his sweater.

Greenberg said he was at his campaign headquarters with four colleagues when a man appeared in the doorway and began firing multiple rounds. One staffer managed to shut the door, which they barricaded using tables and desks, and the suspect fled.

Police apprehended him a short time later, less than a half-mile from the scene. A police report said Brown was carrying a loaded 9 mm magazine in his pants pocket and had a drawstring bag with a handgun and additional handgun magazines.

If admitted for treatment, Brown would remain in Our Lady of Peace psychiatric hospital in Louisville “for the duration of his treatment” and then return to home incarceration, according to the court order signed Saturday.

After a group called the Louisville Community Bail Fund paid the $100,000 cash bond on Feb. 16, Brown was fitted with a GPS ankle monitor and taken to his residence, where he has stayed under home incarceration.

In an interview after Brown’s release, Louisville Community Bail Fund organizer Chanelle Helm said the organization was worried Brown would not get mental health resources he needed while in jail.

A judge has ordered Brown to have no contact with Greenberg or his campaign staff and said Brown cannot possess firearms.

Brown, a social justice activist running as an independent for Louisville’s metro council, disappeared for about two weeks last summer. After he was found safe, his parents issued a statement asking for patience and privacy while they attended to his “physical, mental and spiritual needs.”

Police said Brown appears to have acted alone and the motive remains under investigation.

Last week, Brown had his case sent to a grand jury. Kentucky prosecutors and Brown’s attorney agreed to waive the preliminary hearing  and a grand jury will meet to consider indictments on March 21.

 

Update from February 17, 2022:

WASHINGTON, D.C. – U.S. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) delivered the following remarks Thursday on the Senate floor regarding law and order:

“For the first time in 12 years, an outright majority of Americans say crime has gotten worse in their area over the past year.

“Many Democrats have spent the last year and a half trying to defund police, smear law enforcement, and go soft on crime. As a result, innocent citizens have spent a year and a half watching murders, carjackings, and other violent crimes skyrocket.

“On Monday, my hometown of Louisville was stunned by what appears to have been an assassination attempt against a Jewish mayoral candidate by a prominent far-left activist who’d previously called for defunding our Police Department.

“This far-left Black Lives Matter activist and defund-the-police cheerleader walked into a Jewish Democrat’s campaign headquarters and opened fire.

“Obviously, every aspect of this is still under investigation, including the suspect’s mental condition.

“But guess what: He’s already been let out of jail.

“A left-wing bail fund partnered with BLM Louisville to bail him out.

“Less than 48 hours after this activist tried to literally murder a politician, the radical left bailed their comrade out of jail.

“It is just jaw-dropping. The innocent people of Louisville deserve better.

“Since 2020, a long list of prominent corporations have donated or pledged enormous amounts of money to the radical nationwide BLM parent organization.

“One wonders if any of their corporate money helped spring this would-be assassin from jail.

“Now, I’m confident that if an activist claiming to be conservative tried to assassinate a politician, whatever his mental state, the media would open a 24-7 ‘national conversation’ about rhetoric on the right.

“Somehow I doubt attempted murder by a BLM activist will get that treatment.

“I doubt we’ll have a ‘national conversation’ about the constant chorus of powerful voices calling our society evil.

“I raise this double-standard because it is not limited to media coverage. We’ve seen this extend into our legal system itself.

“In May 2020, when Minneapolis was engulfed in lawless riots, one rioter broke into a pawn shop and started a fire that burned it down. His act of arson killed somebody.

“But the federal attorneys who were supposed to represent the victim and the People went out of their way to push for an unusually lenient sentence. They asked for the typical sentencing guideline to be cut in half.

“Why? Because, they wrote, the defendant was an angry political protestor who lost his cool. They wrote, ‘as anyone watching the news worldwide knows, many other people in Minnesota were similarly caught up.’ As if that were any excuse.

“This is the sentencing memo from the prosecutors. It reads like it was ghostwritten by the defense. They even tried to quote Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. to explain why this guy burned down a pawn shop.

“What a backwards attitude. We cannot have federal officials acting like left-wing political violence is more acceptable than any other violence. If anything, political violence is uniquely unacceptable in a democratic republic.

“I placed a hold on President Biden’s nominee to take over as U.S. Attorney in Minnesota until he pledged he’d keep political favoritism out of his prosecutions. Fortunately, he quickly said so in writing. He also knows Republicans will be watching.

“The American people need public servants to crack down on crime and defend their safety. Less pandering to woke mobs; more protecting innocent families.”

 

Update from February 16, 2022:  

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — A Kentucky man charged with drawing a gun and firing at a Louisville mayoral candidate at his campaign office will be placed on home incarceration after a group posted bond for him Wednesday.

Quintez Brown, 21, was arrested and charged with attempted murder shortly after Monday’s shooting in Louisville. The Democratic candidate, Craig Greenberg, was not hit by the gunfire but said a bullet grazed his sweater.

Brown, a social justice activist running as an independent for Louisville’s metro council, has campaigned with a slate of candidates opposed to projects that they say will worsen gentrification in Kentucky’s largest city. He was also a former intern and editorial columnist for The Courier Journal newspaper.

A group called the Louisville Community Bail Fund paid the $100,000 cash bond on Wednesday afternoon, according to media reports.

Louisville inmates released to home incarceration are fitted with a GPS ankle monitor, said Steve Durham, a spokesperson for Louisville Metro Corrections. Durham said even after bond is posted it could take several hours to process Brown’s release Wednesday evening.

A judge on Tuesday ordered Brown to have no contact with Greenberg or his campaign staff and said he cannot possess firearms. Brown’s lawyer said the man has “serious mental issues” and said he would undergo a psychiatric evaluation.

Greenberg said he was at his campaign headquarters with four colleagues when a man appeared in the doorway and began firing multiple rounds. One staffer managed to shut the door, which they barricaded using tables and desks, and the suspect fled.

Police apprehended him a short time later, less than a half-mile from the scene. A police report said Brown was carrying a loaded 9 mm magazine in his pants pocket and had a drawstring bag with a handgun and additional handgun magazines.

Brown is also charged with four counts of wanton endangerment for allegedly firing shots near Greenberg’s staff.

Police said Brown appears to have acted alone and the motive remains under investigation.

The Louisville bail fund said on its social media page that it “exists to not only bail out folks, but provide post-release support to get them from jail, fed, and to a situation of safety.”

Brown disappeared for about two weeks last summer. After he was found safe, his parents issued a statement asking for patience and privacy while they attended to his “physical, mental and spiritual needs.”

 

Update from February 14, 2022:

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WTVQ) – A well-known activist in Louisville has been arrested and charged in the attempted shooting Monday of a Louisville mayoral candidate.
WHAS 11 reports 21-year old Quintez Brown has been charged with Attempted Murder and four counts of Wanton Endangerment.
Police say Brown walked into the campaign office of Craig Greenburg and opened fire.  Investigators say Greenberg’s clothing was hit by a bullet, but he was not.  They say no one in the office was hurt.
WHAS 11 reports Brown organized youth protests during social justice movements in Louisville in the summer of 2020.  The report says he often wrote opinion columns in the Courier Journal about race relations.
Brown was also the subject of a missing persons investigation last June, which led to a citywide search, according to WHAS 11.  He was eventually found and his family at the time asked for privacy while they focused on Brown’s mental, physical and spiritual health, according to the report.
Brown recently announced he planned to run for Louisville Metro Council’s District 5 seat.
Original story below from February 14, 2022:
LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WHAS11/AP/WTVQ) — A Democratic mayoral candidate in Kentucky’s largest city appeared to be targeted in a shooting Monday but he was not struck, Louisville’s police chief said.

The candidate, Craig Greenberg, said in a social media post that “my team and I are fortunately all safe,” adding: “Thank you for the outpouring of support.”

A suspect was detained but no motive had been determined, Louisville Metro Police Chief Erika Shields said.

“It does appear … that one individual in particular was targeted, and that is one of our mayoral candidates, Craig Greenberg,” Shields said during a media briefing.

“We also have no reason to believe at this time that this individual was acting anything but alone,” Shields said.

Greenberg was in his campaign office when the shooting occurred.

“Mr. Greenberg and his staff were successfully ushered away from the building, and he was not struck in his person, although it does appear as though a round did strike a piece of his clothing,” the police chief said. “The responding officers have detained an individual who we believe is responsible for the shooting.”

The suspect was apprehended outside the building shortly after the shooting, Shields said.

Greenberg launched his mayoral campaign last year and has built a big fundraising lead in a crowded race to succeed outgoing Mayor Greg Fischer.

LMPD Chief Erika Shields said they received 911 calls about an “active aggressor” in the 1200 block of Story Avenue in Butchertown around 10:15 a.m.

Shields said a round hit Greenberg’s clothing, but not his person. No other injuries were reported.

The identity of the suspect has not been released. Shields said that information will remain private until charges are filed.

On Twitter, Greenberg released a statement at 11:45 a.m.: “My team and I are fortunately all safe. We are all with LMPD now. I will provide an update as soon as possible. Thank you for the outpouring of support.”

“We consider ourselves very fortunate today,” Shields said.

Officials with the ATF and FBI will assist in the investigation.

Story Avenue was reopened to traffic around 12:40 p.m., according to a tweet from LMPD.

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