UPDATE: Services set for family killed in I-75 crash

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UPDATE POSTED 8 A.M. TUESDAY, JUNE 8, 2021

OWENTON, Ky. (WTVQ) – The funeral has been set for a mother and four children killed in a traffic accident June 5, 2021, on I-75 in Lexington.

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McDonald & New Funeral Home in Owenton, Ky., with help from the community, is taking care of the Greene family’s funeral expenses.

The family of Catherine, Brayden, Jack, Santanna, and Karmen Greene will receive friends at the First Baptist Church Life Center in Owenton on Thursday, June 10, 2021, at 11 a.m. for a visitation. The funeral will follow at 2 p.m. with Bro. David Wotier presiding. Burial will be in the Beechwood Cemetery.

ORIGINAL STORY POSTED 6 P.M. MONDAY, JUNE 7, 2021

LEXINGTON, Ky. (WTVQ) – Shock is turning into grief for families following an accident over the weekend in Lexington where police say a woman was driving the wrong way on I-75.

She collided with another car Saturday killing all five people in that car from Owenton, four of them children, the wrong-way driver from Madison County also died.

ABC 36 is looking at this from several angles from the impact an accident of this magnitude has on first responders, to safety tips for you should you encounter a wrong-way driver, to a familiar name helping in a time of need.

“Just deal with it, is not the right answer,” Carter said.

The fire department’s Peer Support Coordinator Andy Carter says the right answer for first responders after a crash like this weekends is to talk.

“While doing our job we have to be tough. You have to know going into this that you’re going to see the things those individuals saw on Saturday,” Carter said.

Especially when kids are involved, “Firefighters and kids go hand and hand. We’re going to do whatever we can when a kid is involved and that’s just the nature of who we are and what we do,” Carter said.

AAA’s Lori Weaver Hawkins says there are three risk factors when it comes to driving the wrong way age, driving alone versus with a passenger, and impaired driving.

“The important thing is to of course not drive impaired whether it’s some type of drug impairment or alcohol impairment and don’t drive distracted certainly so that you are aware of your surroundings and are watching for the signage and direction that you need to go,” Hawkins said.

Papal Missionary of Mercy Father Jim Sichko happened to drive up to Saturday’s deadly crash shortly after it happened.

“My first response was I pulled over and I began to pray. Literally with the first responders and those individuals who were being extracted from the vehicle,” Father Sichko said.