Cameron joins 20 attorneys general opposing packing Supreme Court

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Supreme Court gavel MGN Online

FRANKFORT, Ky. (WTVQ) – Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron has joined a coalition of 20 attorneys general in sending a letter to President Joe Biden and congressional leaders opposing recent steps to pack the U.S. Supreme Court.

The letter, signed by the multistate coalition of attorneys general, describes concerns with Congress’ intent to pack the U.S. Supreme Court by passing H.R. 2584.

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The bill was filed just six days after President Biden announced an Executive Order to create a commission to investigate court packing.

The coalition describes these efforts as a “coordinated attempt to justify a naked political power grab” and states that such actions “will seriously undermine our constitutional system, the public’s confidence in our courts, and the rule of law.”

“The Supreme Court is meant to interpret the law, without favor, and it cannot be fashioned into a political machine by President Biden and a narrow majority in Congress,” said Attorney General Cameron.

“The coordinated attempt by the President and Congress to pack the Supreme Court threatens the rule of law and undermines judicial independence, a cornerstone of our Constitutional democracy.”

The coalition points out that more than 80 years ago, President Franklin Roosevelt’s attempt to pack the court failed because of the threat it posed to our constitutional system.

Notably, both Justices Ruth Ginsburg and Stephen Breyer have recently condemned such schemes to pack the court.

The letter states “the Justices of the Supreme Court have repeatedly shown their independence, despite their differences and the labels some have put on them.  When elected officials do not like the outcome in a case, that is not a sign of politicization of the Court, but of the system working. After all, the whims of elected officials are the very thing against which the Court is there to protect the people.”

Cameron signed the letter alongside the attorneys general from Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Texas, Utah, and West Virginia.