Forum to look at COVID and future of Education, registration ends Monday

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LEXINGTON, Ky. (WTVQ) – Curious about how the coronavirus outbreak and related shutdowns have had on education and what it might mean for the future of everything from elementary classrooms to graduate schools? The a conference discussion Wednesday might offer some insight.

But to take part, registration ends at 5 p.m. Monday, Sept. 28.

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This event will examine several key focus areas and topics/issues of discussion:

  • What does the future of Kentucky education look line, from P-12 through higher education considering the pandemic and post-pandemic considerations?
  • Issues in on-line education, the digital divide in Kentucky. How do we create a level playing field? How do we engage students on-line, as if they were in the classroom? How do we keep students motivated and deal with barriers such as procrastination, feelings of isolation, and absence of support? – as well as disengaged teachers and professors.
  • Race & Class-socioeconomic issues in education. From Black Lives Matter and minority challenges to socioeconomic class, poverty, household level of education, clothes, food insecurity and more.
  • The goal of this Conversation is to envision significant takeaways and strategies that will begin to change the narrative on the importance of all forms of education in Kentucky, and create a better synergy and collaboration between K-12 and higher education — university presidents, superintendents, principals and the business community.

The virtual webinar is free ad open to the public but registration in advance is required.  A link to access the broadcast will be emailed to all registrants 24-48 hours prior to the event.

To get more information, click here.

To register, click here.

The speakers include Lt. Gov. Jacqueline Coleman; Aaron Thompson, President of the Council on Postsecondary Education; Kevin Hub, superintendent of Scott County Public Schools; Jason Glass, commissioner of the Kentucky Department of Education; and David McFaddin, president of Eastern Kentucky University.