Taylor family press conference Friday, Governor suggests info release, 2 officers still on leave

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Police and protesters converge during a demonstration, Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2020, in Louisville, Ky. A grand jury has indicted one officer on criminal charges six months after Breonna Taylor was fatally shot by police in Kentucky. The jury presented its decision against fired officer Brett Hankison Wednesday to a judge in Louisville, where the shooting took place. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WTVQ/AP) — One Louisville police officer continues to recover in the

Two men gather outside of Jefferson Square Park following protests over a lack of charges against Louisville police in Breonna Taylor’s death, Thursday, Sept. 24, 2020, in Louisville, Ky. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings)

hospital and the other is at home recovering, Gov. Andy Beshear said Thursday during his daily briefing.

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During the briefing, Beshear answered several questions about Wednesday’s grand jury decision in the Breonna Taylor police shooting decision and resulting reaction, riots and shooting of the two officers.

The governor identified the officers as Maj. Aubrey Gregory, who was released from the hospital with a leg wound, and officer Robin Desroches, who is in the hospital.

The governor noted he has spoken with Gregory and with Desroches’ family.

Police move after a Louisville Police officer was shot, Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2020, in Louisville, Ky. A grand jury has indicted one officer on criminal charges six months after Breonna Taylor was fatally shot by police in Kentucky. The jury presented its decision against fired officer Brett Hankison Wednesday to a judge in Louisville, where the shooting took place. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

“We know that the answer to violence is never violence and we are thinking about those two officers and their families,” said Beshear Wednesday night. “Hopefully we can find ways not just to listen to each other, but to hear. Stay safe. We care about each and every one of you.”

Thursday, he reiterated: “I want to condemn this act of violence in the most stark terms. It is absolutely wrong. We want to make sure that any type of activity or demonstrations remain nonviolent and peaceful. Just one person can mar something that otherwise is done the right way.

“The opportunity to be heard is greater now than ever before. There are more cameras from around the world watching than ever. It’s a real chance to be heard and to affect change…but it must be done in the right way,” he added.

He also said he thought the 9 p.m. curfew should remain in place, calling it necessary.”

Responding to a call by the Rev. Jesse Jackson that athletes boycott the University of Kentucky and the University of Louisville and other colleges in the state, Beshear said it was a misguided suggestion.

“They didn’t have control over the decision…they are doing everything they can to promote change and diversity,” Beshear said, adding it would be the “wrong approach” to tarnish the universities rather than encouraging students and adults to “promote change” appropriately.

As for a possible police reform that would require Kentucky State Police troopers to wear body cameras, Beshear repeated his support for the idea.

“I am for body cameras,” he said. “It’s an issue we absolutely have to address…I believe body cameras can protect the officer as well as the community.”

And he repeated his suggestion Attorney General Daniel Cameron release all the evidence he can for the public to review and make its own decisions about the Taylor case. He said he thought much of the information could be posted online without jeopardizing the ongoing federal civil rights investigation or the criminal case against the indicted officer.

“It’s an attempt to be transparent…let the people see for themselves…at least they aren’t forming opinions in a vacuum,” Beshear said.

The Latest on a grand jury’s decision not to indict police officers on criminal charges directly related to Breonna Taylor’s death: (all times EDT)

4:30 p.m.

The family of Breonna Taylor plans to hold a news conference Friday morning along with civil rights attorney Ben Crump in Louisville.

A news release says they’ll address a grand jury’s decision Wednesday to not indict any of the police officers for Taylor’s death at the news conference scheduled for 10:30 a.m. EDT.

Cities around the country have seen protesters take to the streets following the grand jury decision.

3:45 p.m.

Democratic U.S. Senate candidate Amy McGrath says there is a need to “tackle the systemic racism” in the U.S.

McGrath is challenging U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell in Kentucky’s November election. She met in downtown Louisville on Thursday with some of the protesters who have taken to the streets to seek justice for Breonna Taylor.

Demonstrators turned out Wednesday in Louisville and throughout the country to express their disappointment that police officers weren’t criminally charged in her fatal shooting during a botched drug raid in March.

McGrath called for Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron to release details about the evidence presented to the grand jury in the Taylor case. She faced pushback from some protesters. Rose Henderson says McGrath’s appearance was “all about politics and cameras.”

2:05 p.m.

White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany says she’s not aware of any conversation between President Donald Trump and the family of Breonna Taylor but that their hearts go out to her family.

Asked what the president’s message is to Taylor’s family, McEnany said what happened is “a horrible tragedy” and that their hearts are also with the two police officers who were shot Wednesday night during protests in Louisville.

Cities around the country saw protesters take to the streets following a Kentucky grand jury’s decision to not indict officers in Taylor’s fatal shooting.

1:40 p.m.

A newspaper publisher says two of the paper’s reporters were arrested during protests in Louisville after a grand jury’s decision to not indict officers in the fatal shooting of Breonna Taylor.

Daily Caller publisher Neil Patel says the two reporters were peacefully doing their jobs Wednesday night but police refused to release them.

Police on Thursday confirmed that Shelby Talcott was charged with failure to disperse and unlawful assembly and Jorge Ventura was charged with failure to disperse and violation of curfew. No further details were immediately released.

Cities around the country saw protesters take to the streets following a Kentucky grand jury’s decision.

12:20 p.m.

An arrest citation says video has been recovered that shows 26-year-old Larynzo Johnson shooting at two police officers who were wounded during protests in Louisville over a grand jury’s decision in the fatal shooting of Breonna Taylor.

The citation says Johnson was among a crowd in downtown Louisville that had been told to disperse after setting fires and causing property damage. The citation says Johnson intentionally fired multiple times at officers, hitting two of them.

Johnson has been charged with two counts of assault on a police officer and multiple charges of wanton endangerment of police officers.

Interim Police Chief Robert Schroeder said the two officers are “doing well and will survive their injuries.” Maj. Aubrey Gregory was shot in the hip and was treated and released from the hospital. Officer Robinson Desrouches was shot in the abdomen and underwent surgery.

11:45 a.m.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says peaceful protests honor Breonna Taylor’s memory but he’s condemning violence that erupted after a grand jury didn’t indict officers in Taylor’s fatal shooting.

The Kentucky Republican on Thursday called on the state’s governor and Louisville’s mayor, both Democrats, to take “every necessary step” to secure peace in the state’s largest city.

Two Louisville police officers were shot Wednesday night during protests. McConnell called the shootings acts of “despicable cowardice that must be met with the full force of the law.”

McConnell is running for reelection this year and also says he has full confidence in Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron’s “painstaking pursuit of facts and justice” in the Taylor case.

11:35 a.m.

Interim Louisville Police Chief Robert Schroeder says two of the officers involved in the fatal shooting of Breonna Taylor remain on administrative leave.

Officers Myles Cosgrove and Jonathan Mattingly were among the officers who burst into Taylor’s apartment on March 13 and Schroeder said Thursday morning they have not returned to active duty.

The third officer, Brett Hankison, was fired after the shooting and was charged Wednesday for shooting into neighboring apartments.

11:15 a.m.

Louisville’s police chief says a man has been charged in the shooting of two officers during protests over a grand jury’s decision in the fatal shooting of Breonna Taylor.

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer says one officer was treated and released with a leg wound. Another officer was shot in the abdomen and the mayor says he’s doing well after surgery.

Officials also say a curfew remains in effect for the next two nights after fires and and violence against police officers during protests.

Cities around the country saw protesters take to the streets following a Kentucky grand jury’s decision.

11:05 a.m.

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer says two officers shot during protests over a grand jury’s decision to not indict officers in the fatal shooting of Breonna Taylor are doing well.

Fischer says one officer was was treated and released with a leg wound. Another officer was shot in the abdomen and the mayor says he’s doing well after surgery.

Cities around the country saw protesters take to the streets following a Kentucky grand jury’s decision.

10:55 a.m.

Cities around the country saw protesters take to the streets following a Kentucky grand jury’s decision to not indict officers in the fatal shooting of Breonna Taylor.

Police in Seattle made 13 arrests as authorities said people smashed windows and spray-painted buildings. Seattle police say multiple officers were injured Wednesday night and one was hit in the head with a baseball bat, cracking his helmet.

In Minnesota, several hundred demonstrators rallied late Wednesday at the state Capitol in St. Paul before marching onto an interstate. Protesters denounced what they said was a criminal justice system that has failed to hold the officers accountable for Taylor’s death.

In Denver, police say a man was detained Wednesday night after driving his car through a group of people protesting. Police said no injuries were reported. The Denver Post reported that at least one person was hit near the state Capitol but she said she wasn’t badly hurt.

9:30 a.m.

Police in Portland say protesters hurled Molotov cocktails at officers in Oregon’s largest city during a demonstration over a Kentucky grand jury’s decision to not indict officers in the fatal shooting of Breonna Taylor.

In a statement, police say the protesters Wednesday night also threw rocks that shattered windows at a law enforcement precinct station. One officer was hit on the foot with a Molotov cocktail but a fire department medic managed to extinguish the flames.

Portland has been gripped by protests for four months since the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis. There were no immediate reports of injuries or arrests during the clashes Wednesday night.

9 a.m.

Crews in yellow jackets are cleaning up around downtown Louisville on Thursday morning after protesters filled the streets the night before following a grand jury’s decision to not indict officers in the fatal shooting of Breonna Taylor.

Video showed crews sweeping up garbage and putting it into garbage trucks.

Police say 127 people were arrested. A police statement says some were arrested after damaging businesses and more were detained after jumping on city vehicles being used as barricades. Later, protesters who refused orders to disperse were arrested for curfew and unlawful assembly violations. Police also say some businesses were looted.