“Tradio” show provides sense of community

WSKV-FM in Stanton has continues the success of swap meet radio show, Tradio.

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STANTON, Ky. (WTVQ) – Ties and shirts come and go in style. Other things like a favorite song or car have staying power. But some other things have timeless popularity as well, even in this modern age.

Tucked away in Stanton, Kentucky is a little radio station.

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WSKV FM has been broadcasting since the 1970s in Central and Eastern Kentucky.

“The radio station started in 1972, at that time it was a rock station. Then they transitioned to country. We do a lot with the Appalachian music movement, we work a lot with those folks, as well as play the traditional country music, bluegrass music, and a little Southern rock for flavor,” said station manager Ethan Moore.

While they’ve been flooding the airwaves with country music and good ole’ bluegrass for years, their most popular show might be a surprise.

For more than 40 years, “Tradio” — trade on the radio — has been one of the station’s most popular programs.

“We are aware of a doctor that does brain surgery and listens to old recordings while operating,” said Moore about some of the avid listeners.

It’s a literal swap meet done live. It’s raw, and it’s real.

“I got a good used commode, it’s not hardly a year old,” said one caller looking to sell something.

For an hour and half, six days a week people call in selling everything under the sun.

“I got a pressure washer for sale”

“It’s a brand new quilt.”

“I don’t want no junk, I want one in good shape.”

The calls just roll in.

While it is the epitome of small town radio, to Moore, the show is providing much more.

“You get to know these folks, and likewise it’s hard, we’ve lost some folks that listen as avid listeners, you get to know them, you get welcomed into their car, you know them on a first-name basis,” said Moore about the relationship with listeners.

In a time when staying connected is harder than ever, a simple radio show is providing a sense of community.

“When folks call in regularly, you hear them say I still got my or you helped me sell my, and that’s like music to my ears because I know we’re making a difference. I don’t know how much of a difference, but I know that it has done something,” said ‘Tradio’ host Angela Osborne.