Lexington woman questions her positive coronavirus test

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LEXINGTON, Ky. (WTVQ) – A Lexington woman’s experience with what may have been a false positive coronavirus test exposes potential flaws in a quarantine system designed to try to keep people safe.

Aly Moberly says she’s been fine all summer. She only went to get a rapid coronavirus test on July 31 because the school where she works requires it.

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“I get a call about an hour and a half – two hours later, and they told me I tested positive,” says Moberly. “When I found out that I was positive, I was in complete shock.”

Moberly and her husband started quarantining, but her confusion over her positive results kept coming up. She says this summer she was only around her family and people she worked with. They all tested negative.

“I thought that it really was a false positive,” says Moberly.

She got re-tested four days later, this time using a different kind of test offered in drive and walk thru testing. Two days later, as she expected, she tested negative.

“I was relieved,” says Moberly.

But that relief was mixed with anxiety because up to that point Moberly says she hadn’t heard from the health department. She didn’t receive any information on how to quarantine or for how long.

“So, I started to panic,” says Moberly.

She says she later found out it was because the agency that did the original rapid test, which she doesn’t want to name, didn’t submit her positive result.

Once the miscommunication was taken care of, the health department reached out.

“I was told regardless of whether or not I tested negative a second time, I had to isolate because they can’t change the result,” says Moberly.

Since then, she’s even tested a third time and got another negative result, so she wasn’t exactly thrilled about continuing to quarantine, but she did.

“It would be silly for me to not 100-percent know and then be around people who were compromised, so I respect and understand the reasoning,” says Moberly.

She says she hopes other people feel the same.

“Just be a light to others,” says Moberly. “I think that makes all the difference. There’s nothing we can do about this situation but encourage each other and build each other up.”