Travel ban change, another death in Jackson County, new cases ‘stable’

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FRANKFORT, Ky. (WTVQ) – The state’s new COVID-19 cases returned to a “more normal” level Wednesday and eight new deaths were reported, including at least one more at the hard-hit nursing home in Annville in Jackson County, Gov. Andy Beshear said during his daily briefing.

The state reported 159 new cases, pushing the state’s total to 5,934 cases. Of he new ones, 47 are in Jefferson, 15 in Kenton, nine in Fayette and one each in Adair, Franklin, Lincoln, Madison and Pike counties, among others.

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“The numbers were much more stabilized today, back to our plateau level,” Beshear said.

The governor reported eight new deaths, which brings the state total to 283. Of the deaths, one was in Jefferson County and two were in Kenton County. The governor also reported two in Jackson County although one may previously have been listed.

The Cumberland Valley District Health Department which covers Jackson County reported one death today, a 89-year-old woman at Jackson Manor. It is the county’s 12th death, all patients at the nursing home.

But the health district, which covers Jackson, Rockcastle and Clay counties reported no new cases. Since the pandemic began, the district has had 73 cases — 59 in Jackson and 14 in Rockcastle — bug now only has two active cases in Rockcastle and 24 in Jackson.

Clay County has not had any cases.

Of the 59 cases in Jackson County, all but six have come from the nursing home, including 13 staff.

The state’s testing continues to grow.

As of Wednesday, at least 78,603 tests have been confirmed and Beshear said that number likely is low. And testing sites continue to expand next week through the partnership with Kroger and other businesses.

See the www.ky.covid19.ky.gov for testing locations, times, sign-up procedures and other information.

The governor also said he still hopes to have guidelines Friday for opening child care centers in June, but those guidelines likely won’t allow summer camps to open and operate.

The governor said managing those camps, as popular as they may be, probably won’t be possible.

“We understand the problems for families,” Beshear said.

The governor said he also revised the state’s travel ban to match the directions issued by a federal judge earlier this week. The guidelines, which are only slightly different from the previous order, match Ohio’s guidelines.

The governor also said the state soon will be demonstrating and issuing guidelines for voting in the June 23 primary.