Richmond man pleads guilty to federal drug trafficking and firearms offenses

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guilty plea

LEXINGTON, Ky. (WTVQ) — Officials say 36-year-old Dwayne Thomas Farmer, of Richmond,  has pleaded guilty to trafficking in methamphetamine, possession of a firearm by a convicted felon, and possession of a firearm in furtherance of drug trafficking.

In the course of his guilty plea, Farmer admitted the, on June 27, 2017, law enforcement officers executed a search warrant at his Richmond apartment.  During the search, officers seized over 220 grams of methamphetamine, which was in close proximity to two shotguns.

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Farmer admitted that he had traded methamphetamine for the two shotguns, which were located in his bedroom, behind the couch.  Farmer admitted that he kept the shotguns for protection and that he intended to sell the drugs.  The street value of the methamphetamine was more than $20,000.

Farmer was previously convicted of felony drug trafficking in Knox County, Tennessee and Whitley County, Kentucky, prior to his commission of the federal offenses resolved by his guilty plea.

The investigation was conducted by the ATF, DEA, the Richmond Police Department and the Madison County AHIDTA Task Force.  The United States was represented by Assistant United States Attorney Roger W. West.



Farmer is currently scheduled to appear for sentencing before Chief United States District Judge Karen K. Caldwell, in Lexington, on December 19, 2018.  Farmer faces up to life in prison.  However, any sentence following conviction will be imposed by the Court after consideration of the United States Sentencing Guidelines and the federal statute governing the imposition of sentences.

This case is part of Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN), a program bringing together all levels of law enforcement and the communities they serve to reduce violent crime and make our neighborhoods safer for everyone.  Attorney General Sessions reinvigorated PSN in 2017, as part of the Department’s renewed focus on targeting violent criminals, directing all U.S. Attorney’s Offices to work in partnership with federal, state, local, and tribal law enforcement and the local community to develop effective, local strategies to reduce violent crime.