“Football Field” of Debris found under new elementary school

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FAYETTE COUNTY, KY. (WTVQ)- A new elementary school being built in Fayette County right now is going to cost the district more than anyone thought, after crews found debris buried under much of the construction site.

The new elementary school off Athens-Boonesboro Road is going to be the biggest in Fayette County when it opens in 2019.

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“When the school is built and it’s opened there is always just a rush of excitement and new energy and we’re looking forward to that,” said Myron Thompson, COO of Fayette County Public Schools.

Construction started on the new school this spring after the district bought the more than 25 acre plot just down the road from Jacobsen Park.

“A parent will come in the driveway, it’ll loop around and they’ll drop off and pick up their child at the front entry of the building which is just to the left of where that big wall stops,” said Bill Wallace, director of facility and design construction at FCPS.

But just a few weeks into construction, crews started to find something peculiar.

“What they were finding was this debris, concrete block, concrete with reinforcing sticking out of it, pipe,” said Wallace.

Officials say the debris spans the size of a football field, some of it even buried more than ten feet underground.

“It can be a major slow down if you can’t get some go ahead and try to get a plan and get into it,” said Tim Griggs of Griggs Enterprises, the contractor on the project.

Officials say that’s because much of the debris has to be removed because it could cause sink holes in the future.

“Cause some sort of shift in the subsurface and then the surface material, the pavement is going to collapse,” said Wallace.

Officials say it will probably cost around $1.2 million to dig up and move all of the debris, an amount the school board will vote to approve in its next meeting this month.

“So we’re having to budget for a worse case scenario in terms of re-mediating that debris and sort of building that surface back up,” said Thompson.

But even with this bump in the road, officials say they still believe they’re on track to open the school in the fall of next year.