Ray the D.A. – Introducing Chloe Robertson

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Ray: hello, crime fighters. I’m Ray, the D.A., and this is Straight Talk. Today with us is Chloe Robertson. She’s the new law clerk working with me, and first of all, I think I want to ask you, what are you going to do this semester as a law clerk for a legal beagle?

Chloe: well, the first thing I’ll be doing is a lot of different types of research. So I’ll be helping Ray here, with some homicide research, as well as arm robberies and burglaries. I will also be able to tour the jail, go on a police ride along, as well as I hope to be able to join in on the meetings of the Terrorism Task Force and the Violent Crime Task Force. And I’ll also be able to help organize Straight Talk.

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Ray: the police ride along is something that interns have loved, and you’re going to love it, too. What happens is, is you’ll get in a police car with a policeman at 4:00 and you’ll do his shift with him or her, and you’ll see some stuff that you didn’t know existed in this town.  Well, now that we’ve introduced Chloe, I want to start complaining about how these days the criminals are winning and the citizens and victims are losing. Did you know that in Fayette Circuit Court, 52% of the people that go through that court are probated? That means, put right back on the street. I was raised to believe that if you violated the law, you suffered consequences. I learned that from my parents. When I broke the family rules, it was heck to pay.  Now, I want to tell you, leading the pack in probating is Judge Ernesto Scorsone. He probates 63% of the people that come before him, followed by Judge Travis and Judge Goodwine, who probate 53%. Judge Bunnell probates 46%. It’s pretty scary, and, so any rate … I went to a meeting of something called the criminal justice pack, and that’s a group in Frankfort that I think their purpose is to see how many people they can let out of jail or prison. Once again, eliminating the consequences.

Now let me give you a couple of examples of what they’re recommending. They want to reduce the punishment for drug offenses from a class D felony to a class A misdemeanor. Here’s another thing, they want to give a cost-of-living raise to the thieves. They want to raise the amount of money to make it a felony from $500 to $2,000. That’s going to affect a great, great number of thefts that go on. Now, here’s one that will really offend a lot of the females, all of the moms, single moms in this community. They want to raise the flagrant nonsupport threshold for a felony from $1,000 to $10,000. Now, misdemeanor is one that is … It’s the much lighter punishment. And they also, in this flagrant nonsupport, you have to fail to pay four out of six months. Four out of six months. So if you go six months and pay four times, you get a pass, and then you go the next six months. And if you do less than four, you still get a pass.  I’m very concerned about what they’re doing to the public safety in Frankfort. A matter of fact, I think that they have thrown public safety of our citizens right under the bus. They’ve put a price tag on public safety. And public safety is what people expect from government.  So, Chloe, thanks for being here. And thank you all for listening to my rant. I’ll see you next time.

Disclaimer: the opinions expressed in this segment are not necessarily those of the management and staff of ABC 36.