People ditching cars for bikes in Lexington

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LEXINGTON, Ky. (WTVQ) – Lexington has over 24 miles of shared use paths for walking, running and biking. But recently, a lot of bikers are ditching the paths for the road and ditching their car for their bike on the way to work.

“Sometimes days don’t allow for it or I have meetings or long distance trips that I have to make, but for the most part, as much as I possibly can,” says Scott Thompson, the bike and pedestrian coordinator for Lexington-Fayette’s Urban County Government.

It’s a growing trend among people across the country and right here in the bluegrass, biking to work.

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"We live in such a beautiful area for riding,” says Steph Allen. “It’s unfortunate that some people don’t get to see what I see from a saddle.”

The League of American Bicyclists compiled numbers from United States census data and released a report that said, since 1990, the number of people riding a bike to work in Lexington has increased 435%. It’s the second largest increase in the country.

“It’s great, we love to see more people doing it, it become safer for everybody,” Thompson says. "It promotes health, it helps with air pollution, it helps with congestion, all the things we look for in transportation planning to make a difference.”

May is also National Bike Month and it is well underway in Lexington. There is a bike-related event almost every day.  A calendar of events happening in Lexington is available here.

Pedal Power Bike Shop, one of the sponsors of Bike Lexington, a organization that helps promote cycling in the Bluegrass, was at the start of Legacy Trail Wednesday evening with bike maker Giant, letting people test ride bikes.

“All they need to do is bring their driver’s license and a credit card, and they can pick a road bike or mountain bike in the fleet, and just take it out and have a good time,” Allen says.

For those on the fence about whether to try a bike…

“If everyone could see what I see right now when I do this, people would be a lot happier,” Allen says. “On the interstate you get road rage and angry, and I’ve never had road rage or anger on my bike.”

More information about getting involved in biking in the Bluegrass is available here.