Law Enforcement Practices School Shooting Response

Reported by: Aaron Adelson
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Updated: 6/26/2013 8:26 pm
Twitter: https://twitter.com/AAdelsonABC36

How would law enforcement respond if your child's life was in danger at school?  1- different law enforcement agencies came to Montgomery County High School, training for an active shooter. 

Police methodically moved from room to room looking for a gunman.  They moved past the injured. 

"Triage comes second, because we must eliminate and control the threat so we don't create more victims," said Mt. Sterling Police Chief David Charles.

Police say they can't assume a shooter is alone.

The scenario is just a drill, but the anxiety is real.

"It gets pretty stressful," said Officer Aaron Noel, Mt. Sterling Police.

"When one of the ladies started yelling for her child, that's when it got pretty real," said Macie Spence, a volunteer student.

An adult played the role of a frantic parent.  She burst into the school screaming for her child.  The police restrained her.

"They used just enough force to keep me from getting away, or hurting anyone, but as soon as I quit struggling they let up," said Eden Myers, pretending to be a frantic parent.

Chief David Charles says officers are more prepared after the drill, but he wants to practice more.  He says the real thing would be a lot more chaotic.  He says the key to saving lives during a school shooting would be inter-agency communication. 
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