Tree Branches Cause Power Outages

Tree Branches Cause Power Outages

Kentucky Utilities says about 7,500 of their customers lost power Sunday because of the weekend storm. They say it was because of tree branches that fell on power lines, not because of ice on the lines.

Kentucky Utilities says about 7,500 of their customers lost power Sunday because of the weekend storm.  They say it was because of tree branches that fell on power lines, not because of ice on the lines.

Not all of those customers lost power at the same time but many of them were in Central Kentucky.  

KU says most of the time when power goes out, it is because ice weighs tree branches down and causes them to fall on the power lines.

KU says their power lines can withstand about an inch of ice and in the 2003 storm, some lines kept working with more than an inch of ice.

KU says there wasn’t enough ice in the weekend storm to make their power lines sag and break but they say it doesn’t take a lot for tree branches to fall, especially if they are older trees.

“We're in a situation now, while the temperature continues to go up overnight, there'll be more of the ice that will be dropping off these tree limbs,” said Cliff Feltham with Kentucky Utilities.  “Hopefully those temperatures will stay up high enough that it will get most of the ice out of the trees and then we won't have this issue to deal with.”

KU is still looking into the cause of an outage in Elizabethtown but they expect power to be restored to all their customers by midnight Monday.

They say since the ice storm in 2003, KU is aggressive when it comes to trimming trees away from power lines.  They say they do it on a yearly cycle depending on how dense the branches are near power lines and they say they are constantly watching lines.

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