Technology Advances Since Super Tornado Outbreak

Technology Advances Since Super Tornado Outbreak

40 years ago on Thursday, an outbreak of tornadoes covered over two thousand miles of terrain in 13 states, including the Bluegrass. Four people were killed in Frankfort. The community gathered there at a local theatre to watch two documentaries that feature the 1974 “Super Outbreak.”

40 years ago on Thursday, an outbreak of tornadoes covered over two thousand miles of terrain in 13 states, including the Bluegrass.

Four people were killed in Frankfort. The community gathered there at a local theatre to watch two documentaries that feature the 1974 “Super Outbreak.”

More than 300 people were killed across the country by the tornados, 6,000 people were injured and it caused more than $1 billion in damage.

“Any large event, people want to do something to make sure something that bad doesn’t happen again,” Deron Rambo, Franklin County 911 Director, said.

According the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, several of the tornadoes of the "Super Outbreak" were among the most severe ever recorded.

At one point in the storm, at least 15 tornadoes were on the ground at the same time.

The tornados also changed the way meteorologists cover severe storms.

“Doppler Radar used to be a green mass that looks like there’s fog on it,” Rambo said. “Now we can look at so many angles and so many things they can look for. It’s really amazing.”

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