Sweet 16 Boosts Businesses, But Not All

Sweet 16 Boosts Businesses, But Not All

As the Sweet 16 kicked off in Lexington, the Convention and Visitors Bureau said business booms in downtown Lexington. But Jeff Miller, the owner of “Howard & Miller,” said the High School Boy’s Basketball Tournament hurts his business.

As the Sweet 16 kicked off in Lexington, the Convention and Visitors Bureau said business booms in downtown Lexington.

But Jeff Miller, the owner of “Howard & Miller,” said the High School Boy’s Basketball Tournament hurts his business.

“Yea it's detrimental to my business,” Miller said. “Doesn't help me, which is probably abnormal to most of the people.”

Miller said while thousands of visitors are in town, they take up all of the parking spaces in downtown. Without parking, Miller said his regular customers cannot get to the store.

“Don't get me wrong, I do get some business out of it,” Miller said. He said customers who walk across the street from Rupp usually buy a tie or a t-shirt, not the jackets or suits.

“I could see how this could be beneficial if you're a restaurant,” Miller said about the tournament in downtown, “But as a general retailer, it's tougher.”

Miller said the men’s business and casual clothing store opened in 1984.

Niki Heichelbech, from the Convention and Visitors Bureau, said the tournament being held in Lexington is a big economic boost to the downtown businesses.

Heichelbech said the number of people who stay in downtown Lexington for the Sweet 16 changes every year because it all depends on what teams make it to the tournament and how far they go in the tournament.

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