Public Reaction To Somerset Wet Vote

Public Reaction To Somerset Wet Vote

Community reaction to Somerset approving the sale of alcohol in the city is mixed.
Serving coffee is normal for Briar Bowl Lanes in Somerset. But serving alcohol will be something new.

"This is the first place I ever bowled that they didn't have alcohol in the building," says Norman Levine. He bowls at Briar Bowl Lanes around three times a week.

With the wet law passed, restaurant owners are hoping for more business.

"In the day time, it's a little slow," Robert Hoskins, an employee at Briar Bowl Lanes comments.

With the passing of the new Wet Law, Hoskins thinks business will pick up.

"But defiantly during the winter time because nobody goes to the lake and they all go bowling," Hoskins says.

Somerset was the largest dry city remaining in Kentucky. 2,167 people voted for the Wet Law, while 1,464 voted to keep the Dry Law.

Not everyone is happy about the poll results.

"You can imagine the disappointment on my shoulders," Ed Amundson, Dry Vote Chairperson says. "I feel responsible. Because we did run a great campaign, but the vote was pretty distinct."

Amundson's work for this issue isn't complete. City Officials asked him to be on an advisory committee for alcohol use in Somerset.

"I'll be able to help with some of the implementation and that will subdue some of the sting," Amundson comments.

It will take around 60 days to set up the alcohol guidelines.

Community members hope these changes will bring more restaurants to the area and more crowds to those businesses.

"There's a lot of people who come here anyway just to hang out, but this will make it more popular," Lauren Reynolds says about Briar Bowl Lanes.

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