Reading is Common Language at Book Fair

Reading is Common Language at Book Fair

People can read pretty much anywhere thanks to technology. Sunday, lovers of good, old-fashion books came together for the 32nd annual Kentucky Book Fair.

People can read pretty much anywhere thanks to technology.  Sunday, lovers of good, old-fashion books came together for the 32nd annual Kentucky Book Fair. 

It’s Kentucky’s oldest and one of the largest book fairs.  It draws about 4,000 people every year. 

“This is my favorite day of the year, my favorite event to come to,” said Larry Moore, a publisher attending the Kentucky Book Fair.

“We know that we all have reading in common so we speak a common language,” said Sue Grafton, author of W Is For Wasted.

“I didn't expect this many books, there's so many different ones,” said Kayla Quijas, a 14-year-old volunteer at the book fair who hopes to one day be an author.  “It's pretty amazing.”

175 authors were at the Kentucky Book Fair at the Frankfort Convention Center Sunday.  The authors signed books and could talk to readers about their book.

“To listen to why they wrote a book, to me it adds a lot to the level of the book when you're reading it,” said Jason Quijas, a first-time attendee of the book fair.

“Just opening the pages and the experience, the feel of the paper, the smell of the book and then you read the words and you're transported into a world you didn't even know existed before,” said Moore.

Proceeds from the book fair will go to grants for public schools and libraries in Kentucky.

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