New Epinephrine Auto-Injector Talks Administrator Through Steps

New Epinephrine Auto-Injector Talks Administrator Through Steps

What happens if a child has an allergy attack at school and a medical professional is not in the building?

There are 66 schools and special programs in Fayette County and about half as many nurses to cover all of those buildings.

So what happens if a child has an allergy attack and a medical professional is not in the building?

Some allergy specialists are encouraging families to get a new epinephrine auto-injector – one that can talk someone through administering a shot.

Nurses at Allergy and Asthma Physicians of Central Kentucky said if a child’s allergies are triggered at school, someone who's never given an EpiPen before may have to give the student a shot.

Auvi-Q is a new injector that will talk you through the process step by step.

“They don't have to think about how to use it,” Patricia Ray, an allergy nurse, said. “And they never see the needle. Ever.”

“It's scary to send a child with severe food allergies to school because they're allergic to something that is everywhere and so to know that your child could be around something that is allergic to them is very scary,” Laura Jackson said.

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