Limiting Use Of Lasix Debated At Town Hall Meeting

Limiting Use Of Lasix Debated At Town Hall Meeting

The Kentucky Racing Commission heard from the public at a town hall meeting Tuesday afternoon on limiting the use of the anti-bleeding drug Lasix in horse racing.
The Kentucky Racing Commission heard an avalanche of opposition to limiting the use of the anti-bleeding drug known as Lasix.

The public had a chance to comment Tuesday afternoon during a town hall meeting in Frankfort.

Most of the thoroughbred trainers, owners and veterinarians who spoke at the meeting, claimed the therapeutic drug is good for the horse.

The state Racing Commission is considering a proposal that would ban the use of Lasix on race day for horses running in graded stakes races.

The controversy pits the public's perception of doping against the horses well-being.

Many breeders are in favor of the ban.  They want Kentucky to lead the way in North America to ban the drug's use.

Lasix isn't used in Europe, Asia, Australia or the Middle East.

Studies show about 98-percent of all thoroughbreds that race in Kentucky use Lasix.  The national average is 95-percent.

Exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage is common in racehorses.

Lasix reduces blood pressure in the lungs and reduces the severity of bleeding, but doesn't eliminate it.

Lasix has been used in horses since the late 1960's.

The Racing Commission deadlocked on a vote on the proposed ban back in April.

Now, the watered-down version is expected to get another vote June 13th.
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