Lexington Receives Domestic Violence Grant

Lexington Receives Domestic Violence Grant

For the 3rd time, the city of Lexington lands a major federal grant that will help it crackdown on the number of domestic violence cases in town.
For the 3rd time, the city of Lexington lands a major federal grant that will help it crackdown on the number of domestic violence cases in town.

A recent university of Kentucky study says 1 in 3 Kentucky women will be victims of domestic violence in their life. 

That's higher than the national average. 

But Lexington officials have been on a mission to curb that trend.

"This grant says there will be consequences for beating someone up," says Fayette County Commonwealth Attorney, Ray Larson.

The city is receiving a $400,000 domestic violence grant.

Since it was first given to the city in 2007, the city says there's been a 70% increase in arrests of domestic violence offenders.

The grant will continue to help train police investigate and catch offenders.

It will also maintain the two current victim advocate positions within the police department to work directly with getting quick assistance to victims.

"It could be something a simple as a lock change that they need. But they don't know that our community will provide them, so its getting those services to them earlier," says Teri Faragher, Executive Director of the Domestic Violence Prevention Board.

It will also create a part-time position at the Commonwealth Attorney's office, that will identify and help work on high-risk cases.

"To take a piece of the puzzle that each of our agencies are dealing with and follow it throughout the system... as opposed to having to feel like either the victim has to be the one to relay all the important information at each agency stop," says Mary Houlihan of the Commonwealth Attorney's Office.

Faragher says putting the new position inside the Commonwealth Attorney's office will add strength to the cause.

"We thought it was a really good fit because they're already concerned about high-risk and have been promoters of Amanda's Law in this community and the need for GPS monitoring in some cases," she says.

Houlihan says the grant will allow the community to implement portions of Amanda's Law.

Lexington Police say while the number of arrests in domestic violence cases has jumped up, the city still averages 1100 cases this year.

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