Grieving Mother Wants Special Session To Fight Heroin Epidemic

Grieving Mother Wants Special Session To Fight Heroin Epidemic

22 people died in Fayette County in 2012 from heroin overdoses. This year, already 13 people have died with 11 more cases pending.
Kentucky has a problem with heroin. 

The Governor is deciding whether to call lawmakers back for a special session to deal with it. 

The House never voted on a heroin bill during the session that just ended.  A sponsor of Senate Bill 5 says it will save lives. 

As a pretrial officer, Beni Parsons say she hears every day about heroin.

"Drugs have ruined my life, and I've never done them," said Parsons.

She says something needs to be done.  She wants legislators to come back to Frankfort, and pass Senate Bill 5. 

"I don't know the answer.  It may never be solved, but if even one life can be saved from it, I think it's worth it," said Parsons.

Kyley Palmer is one of the 44 people in Fayette County who died in 2013 from a heroin overdose. 

A man found her dead one afternoon on Leeann Lane in Lexington.  Police never found out how she got there. 

March 28th, she would have turned 22.  On her daughter's Birthday, Parsons released balloons, and got her headstone.

"My daughter...I've always felt that she had a purpose in life, and she did give me three beautiful grandchildren, but I always thought she was meant for much bigger things, and maybe this was her way of somehow helping other people," said Parsons, Palmer's Mom. 

Governor Beshear says it's too early to tell if he needs to call people back for a special session. 

The Senate passed the bill in January. 

Speaker Stumbo says the House ran out of time. 

Time Parsons wishes she had with her daughter.

"it's gotta be done sooner than later," said Parsons.

So far this year 13 people in Fayette County died from a heroin overdose.  The Coroner says he's waiting for toxicology reports on 11 more cases. 

Senate Bill 5 proposes a three-pronged approach:
1) Trying to educate kids so they never use heroin
2) Helping addicts get treatment
3) Harsher penalties for dealers, and making it easier to charge them with murder
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