Georgetown Doctor: How To Avoid Hypothermia

Georgetown Doctor: How To Avoid Hypothermia

Doctors say freezing temperatures are a serious medical risk. Even a short amount of time in the cold can cause frostbite or hypothermia.
Doctors say freezing temperatures are a serious medical risk.

Even a short amount of time in the cold can cause frostbite or hypothermia.

Doctors say frostbite occurs when the skin's cells kill themselves and turn black.

According to physicians, you should treat frostbite by going indoors and applying a warm washcloth to the damaged area.

Central Kentucky ER Doctor Ryan Stanton says, "One of the big things here also is you really can't feel it. One of the main symptoms associated with it is numbness. You can get things that are too hot. It could cause more tissue damage because you can't feel it."

Doctors say your body pulls blood in close to your heart when you're cold.

That's why your ears, nose, fingers and toes get cold first.

Doctors say you get hypothermia when your heart no longer has warm blood.
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