Cyber Sales Climb Locally, Nationally

Cyber Sales Climb Locally, Nationally

'Cyber Monday' had shoppers rushing to click on websites--instead of standing in line at store sites--to take advantage of deals for their holiday needs.
It's called 'Cyber Monday' for a reason.

Instead of braving traffic, long lines, and crowds (like for predecessor 'Black Friday'), shoppers simply had to turn on their computer and go to their favorite retailer's website.

The online bargain day boasted sales and discounts on products--again, like the Friday before it--offering deals that many wanted to finish their holiday shopping.

A Shop.Org survey estimated that around 129.2 million Americans would take part in the massive display of consumerism.

In Lexington, there were those who considered the lack of necessity in physically going to retail locations beneficial.

"To avoid, you know, the traffic and the crowds...it's just a lot easier," said online shopper Megan Dykes. She added, "Most all my holiday shopping is finished."

And it wasn't only national chains--like Target, Best Buy, or Walmart--that offered online deals.

The University Press of Kentucky offered discounts of up to 80% on their wares (which spokespeople said would continue until mid-February), and the Lexington Legends had sales on merchandise.

Despite the deals, Better Business Bureau officials warned that consumers still need to shop smart.

"Anyone can put up a website--just because it's on the internet doesn't mean it's legit, so to speak," warned Heather Clary, Director of Communications for the BBB of Lexington.

"If the deal sounds too good to be true, it almost certainly is," she said.
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