1 In 5 Kentuckians Struggles To Buy Food

1 In 5 Kentuckians Struggles To Buy Food

The Food Research and Action Center released a report saying 20.3% of Kentuckians didn't have enough money to buy food that they needed in 2012
Twitter: https://twitter.com/AAdelsonABC36

The Food Research and Action Center released a report saying in 2012, 20.3% of Kentuckians did not have enough money to buy the food they needed.

The statistic includes James McGibbins, but he never wanted to call for help.

"Well it was kind of embarrassing, but it felt good after I got it.  That's for sure," said McGibbins.

He says he collects food stamps, but they only last a couple of weeks.  He relies on the food pantry to survive.

"Without the help, I'd be going hungry that's for sure.  By the time I pay my rent and bills you have nothing left," said McGibbins.

McGibbins says he suffers from a bad back, lung disease, and thyroid problems. 

"I'm not able to work and stuff.  I draw disability, which is not very much money," said McGibbins.

Many Kentuckians are like him.  According to the Kentucky Association of Food Banks (KAFB) food pantries are serving 84% more people since the recession began.   Hearing the one in five statistic did not shock KAFB's Director.

"I'm sorry to say I was not a bit surprised, because we know.  We see the demand every day that more and more families are turning to food banks to help," said Tamara Sandberg, KAFB Executive Director.

Because of the high demand, food pantries need help.  Pantries prefer a monetary donation to a food donation, because they can buy in bulk, and stretch the dollar farther. 
Page: [[$index + 1]]